Enough Already: Campaign slogans and lawn signs

A run down of the highs and lows of campaign season and some tips on yard signs.

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Chicago's late Mayor Richard J. Daly was famous for fracturing the English language. A much-cited Dalyism was uttered when he tried to describe the "plateaus" the city government had attained.

"We are rising to higher and higher platitudes," Daly noted, and platitudes are what we're dealing with this entire election cycle.

Platitudes particularly related to the economy and jobs. Apparently if you elect certain candidates based on what they're saying, the dire unemployment and economic situations will be solved overnight. New companies will come racing to Oregon with family wage jobs and the state's economy will become robust in minutes.

I don't think so, but apparently a lot of voters do think that a simple change of office will right all wrongs, heal all wounds and right the ship of state.

Beyond the ship of state, there's the state of the nation and the constant whine from some voters that they "want our country back." That slogan sounds like something the American Indian Movement (AIM) might have used by in the late 1960s and early 1970s. After all, they are the Native Americans?

Moving on to lawn signs, can we discuss sign coloration? Who told candidates that white signs with blue or green writing were legible, let alone memorable? They aren't.

Signs with a blue bodies and red and white lettering are most legible and stand out. So kudos to the Dudley, Kozak and Capell campaigns for good sign design.

Finally to my favorite candidate name of this election cycle: Wells Ashby. I don't know Mr. Ashby yet every time I see his name on a lawn sign my mind conjures up a character out of a Jane Austen novel. You know, "squire Wells Ashby, laird of Avon Manor, cut a dashing figure at the yuletide ball."

I wish Mr. Ashby well and all who take the time to run for local and state offices.


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