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Bend Nest » By The Numbers

Back to School Around the World

Check out these global education fun facts!

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  • PIxabay

The City Montessori School in Lucknow, India, is the largest school in the world in terms of number of students, with more than 32,000 in attendance.

Source: youtube.com

The students in China receive the most homework in the world. On average, teenagers do a whopping 14 hours of homework per week.

Source: theepochtimes.com

Pakistan does not give children a legal right to free education. Only children between the ages of 5 and 9 are entitled to compulsory education.

Source: psa.sch.ae

France has the shortest school year from August to June and also the longest school day.

Source: highereducation.frenchculture.org

Children in Germany receive a special cone called Schultüte, which is filled with pens, pencils, books and snacks. The catch is that they can only open it when they start school.

Source: prettypinktulips.com

The world's oldest school is in Canterbury, England. The King's School, as it is named, was founded in 597 AD.

Source: newlifechristianschool.org

Kids in Japan are the most independent of students. They travel to school alone, clean their own classrooms and even carry their own lunch.

Source: artikuno.com

Iran is one country where girls and boys are educated separately until the time they reach college.

Source: awwproject.org

In Kenya, it is not mandatory for children to go to school, but most children do attend at some point.

Source: povertyactionlab.org

In Brazil, having meals with family is an important part of the culture, which is why schools start at 7 am and are over by noon so that the kids can have lunch with their parents.

Source: en.wikipedia.org

The world's highest school is situated in Phumachangtang, Tibet, at a height of 17,600 feet above sea level.

Source: telegraph.co.uk

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