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Culture » Take Me Home

Home Improvements Outpacing New Home Construction

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Being very concerned about the lack of affordable housing in our area, I'm constantly researching possible solutions and current and future housing trends. This past month, several media articles have stated that home improvement and remodeling projects are outpacing new home construction. Another hot topic: the increase in the median age of owner-occupied homes. These trends indicate more people are choosing to stay in their homes instead of moving, which naturally has an influence on housing supply.   

According to BuildFax, remodeling has increased by about 30 percent over the last five years. Home Depot reported sales increases of 8.4 percent from the second quarter of 2017 to the second quarter of 2018. Additionally, American Association of Retired Persons surveys report about 90 percent of homeowners approaching retirement wish to age in place in their current homes.

With the median age of owner-occupied currently at 37 years—up from 31 years in 2005—along with the increase in home improvement and maintenance projects, this is an indicator that people are improving their current residences as an alternative to moving. High prices and low inventories make it more desirable to stay put and help keep housing inventories down, along with too few new construction units to meet consumer demand.

About The Author

Nick Nayne, Principal Broker

Principal Broker at The Broker Network Realty in Bend, OR. Over 12 years experience in Real Estate working with buyers, sellers and investment properties.

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