Opinion » The Mailbox

Letters to the Editor: August 21-28

One reader finds a note on her car: "Welcome to Oregon, Now Go Home."

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@simeonpurkey tagged us in this awesome shot at Powell's Sweet Shoppe.
  • @simeonpurkey tagged us in this awesome shot at Powell's Sweet Shoppe.


California Plates — Finding a Note That Says, "Welcome to Oregon, Now Go Home."

Well, with plates like these no wonder you got a note... no, just kidding. Not actual license plate, used for illustration purposes only.
  • Well, with plates like these no wonder you got a note... no, just kidding. Not actual license plate, used for illustration purposes only.

The first time I came to Bend over 20 years ago it was love at first sight. I knew this was the place that I belong. The place that felt like home. Not many people get to find that place in their lifetime, but I did.

I lived in Oregon, moved to California (due to my husband's job) and now I'm back. During my time living in CA, I continued to come to Bend as much as possible, including renting houses and living here in the summertime. You do what you have to do to be where you love. I still love Bend and now live here full time (a dream come true).

This summer I am saddened by the anti-tourist/anti "out of state" antics that I've witnessed here. The other day I finished a run and found on my car a note that said "Welcome to Oregon, now go home." Yes I still have CA plates on my car, but I AM home.

I noticed that all the other cars in the lot with out of state plates had the same note. I get that people are upset by the growth of Bend and the lack of high paying jobs and affordable housing. I'm a victim of this too. But this person (or people) doesn't know my story, or other people's story. They ASSUME that we are all tourists and/or rich transplants and are telling us we should leave.

It was heartbreaking to me.

In the 20 plus years that I've been coming here, I've never witnessed such contempt. I've always bragged about how friendly Bend is, how it is such an amazing, welcoming place. I still think Bend is amazing and I love living here. Whomever the person or group is that is going around with these messages, I urge you to think twice about what you are doing. It is unkind and sending the wrong message.

I'm not going to let you get me down. I know I belong here. Home is where your heart is and my heart lives in Bend.

— Chris Samaras.


In Response to, "Mirror Pond to Dredge or Not to Dredge, That's the $6.6 Million Question"(8/16)

To quibble a bit with the fine investigative piece on dredging Mirror Pond, "Mirror Pond: To Dredge or Not to Dredge" cites a Nov. 2016 City of Bend survey, but leaves out an important finding. While it is true that 60 percent of respondents said it was extremely important to "ensure that historic aesthetic and iconic pond views are maintained," 77 percent of the same sample felt it extremely important to provide improved water quality, river banks and wildlife habitat."

Can we have healthy river conditions AND keep the dam and pond?

A sizeable portion of the public seems to think so, despite evidence to the contrary. Kudos to the City of Bend for producing the only statistically accurate survey ever done on Mirror Pond. But, can the next survey, where it lists the usual options for the future of Mirror Pond, ALSO append the cost in terms of environmental degradation and public expenditure that goes with each choice?

— Foster Fell


We asked, You Answered, "How Would You Describe the Total Eclipse, in One Word?"

Surreal — Mariah Staats

Phantasmagoric — Jessica Rae

Ecliptical — Tyler Mathers

Eerie — Karen Gojdics Smuland

Chills (Because I was cold) — Ban Tat

Haunting — Ethan Maffey

Breathtaking — Jeannie Whittle

Dreamy! — Lindsey Clark

Fleeting — Cynthia Flupachi

Dark — Sarah Guilfoy

Electrifying — Christine Alvarado

Incredible — Mandee Love

Rad — Anne Pick

Exhilarating — Richard Sitts

Beautiful — Esther Gray

Tiiight — Wyatt Gaines

Humbling — Faith Gilpin

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

— Magdalena Bokowa

Over. — Bruce Hilliard


In Response to, Smooth and Seamless, Heavy Eclipse Planning Pays Off (8/23)

eclipse_1_.jpg

Planning ahead is a heck of lot better than being caught short. The Central Oregon Emergency site was a big help for fire and eclipse updates.

It's good to know that the counties can plan, coordinate and share together for any big event, or catastrophe. Central Oregon rocked the event and information!

— Angela Carmen

I think Wednesday or Thursday night there was a big freak out about gas and food on Facebook. I decided to go get some gas for one vehicle then and the other in the morning. I was awake so no biggie.

Left my house at 11pm from Boyd Acres by Cooley Road. Drove to Business 97 all the way down to Third Street and down past Walmart and every gas station was closed with cones in front of the pumps. I took this to mean they were out of gas. When I arrived at the AM/PM there were 60-70+ cars lined up for gas.

I wasn't overly concerned but decided to wait anyways. It took an hour to gas up and there were more people there when I left at 1am than when I arrived. That was the only crazy moment in the whole week of the eclipse.

A manufactured Facebook frenzy.

— Matthew Bryant

It was good to plan ahead which is what I did because of the warnings. I avoided C.O. for that reason (traffic etc.) but instead hit Stanley, Idaho — but went the back route to avoid predicted delays. Awesome experience!

— Ron O'Brien

Well, now I have tons of booze and groceries and my gas tank is full. Could be worse.

— Shelly Lilja


I'm actually really proud of the planning done by Central Oregon emergency services. Multiple hippie festivals focused on a major celestial event and not a single reported case of human sacrifice.

Good job, everyone!

— Jason Adams

Letter of the Week

Anything involving talk of evaded human sacrifice simply has to garner a win for letter of the week. Thanks for making us laugh!

Come on in for your gift card to Palate.

— Nicole Vulcan, Editor


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