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Amy Lowes For Deschutes County

Amy Lowes — who is running for Deschutes Country Commissioner, Chair 1 —came here 22 years ago for the same reasons I did on my Harley from Connecticut in 1951, and many of you did earlier and later: the imagnificient beauty, wildlife and recreation recources our county offers.

Farmers, ranchers, birders and other conservationists have endorsed Amy for her commitment to preserve our quality of life and to ensure that growth will not destroy or weaken our natural resources.

Sure, there will be tough decisions to be made. Like-it-or-not, we're on the precipice of the type of growth that necessitates critical thought and detailed evaluation of the precedents we set in regard to land-use. Amy's committed to making decisions based upon scientific evidence, Love-of-the-Land, and economic impact studies. She knows intensive forethought is vital as it relates to natural resource decisions.

Amy's very aware that our present county commissioners have let go of the land-use principles voted for in the '70's: to protect mule deer and elk migration corridors. They were written not just to protect deer and elk — but for all the other wildlife that lives with them — like insects, white-footed mice, sagebrush lizards, song birds and the owls, hawks and kestrels who depend on the entire ecosystem to stay alive.

I was a member of the planning commission in the 70's and we spent many days and long hours trying to make sure the wildlife overlay we created would stay in place for years to come. However, our present county commissioners have thrown it to the wind, but Amy says she'll change that, and, by-golly, I believe she will.

As a hospice nurse, she advocated for people facing end-of-life crises across Deschutes County, many with very different values, beliefs, income levels, and needs. Her commitments to working collaboratively with people of Deschutes County in their behalf is proven and well established.

Amy also has the fiscal and people management skills developed as the owner of a number of small businesses with staffs of over 50 people and complex budgets.

She also has the courage to stand up for her ideas and use her collaborative skills to work effectively with city and state officials. But above all, she will uphold the land-use rules already set in motion to maintain and increase the native wildlife habitat so vital to the welfare of all our natural treasures.

Jim Anderson-Naturalist/Author

Jamie Mc-Leod-Skinner Can Win

Based on data from www.OregonVotes.gov, Jamie McLeod-Skinner can defeat Greg Walden in November's election for U.S. Congress. The percentage of registered voters in Oregon's CD-02 is: Republican-34 percent, Non-affiliated-33 percent, Democrat-26 percent, Independent-5 percent, and other parties-2 percent.

In past elections, Greg Walden has garnered, on average, 70 percent of the vote. These results have given some people the impression that a Democratic candidate would not have a snowball's chance in hell of ever beating Walden. However, when one realizes that 40 percent of the electorate is neither Republican nor Democrat, Greg Walden no longer looks like the obvious winner in November's election. A coalition of Non-affiliated, Independent, Democratic, and "other party" voters will determine the outcome of November's election.

Many people across Oregon's CD-02 believe Greg Walden has turned his back on them. He has voted against healthcare programs, for massive tax breaks for the wealthiest 1 percent, against net neutrality, and for slashing the EPA budget. He has refused to talk directly with constituents and has catered to the interests of powerful lobbyists and mega-corporations. Jamie McLeod-Skinner, on the other hand, has talked with people from every part of our congressional district and is committed to addressing their concerns in Congress.

As a result of voter dissatisfaction with Greg Walden and voter enthusiasm for Jamie McLeod-Skinner, a coalition of voters will give Jamie McLeod-Skinner the edge in November's election. Let's all join together to send Jamie McLeod-Skinner to Washington, D.C. to represent us. She can indeed win.

—Mary Love

Please Vote, But Not For Me!

My name is Joshua Langlais and I am one of Bend's many candidates for mayor. As you may already know, this race is very close. I am keenly aware that there is no chance of my becoming mayor and as voting day approaches, I wanted to caution you that a vote for me is a vote wasted.

I entered this race because I hoped to shift the conversation away from esoteric political matters and toward the more social concerns of affordability and living together as a whole and healthy community in which every single voice is welcome and valued. I believe that I did that. I showed up to every interview and every debate that I was able to attend with transparency and sincerity. My voice was heard and I did indeed change the conversation.

In the most ideal of worlds, your vote for me would show that we are fed up with politics as usual and we are ready for big changes. And while I do wish that were the case, that is not the world we live in and a vote for me will essentially be rendered useless. We just can't afford that. Your vote matters too much. This election matters too much.

I don't want to tell you who to vote for—it isn't my place and I might not have all that much influence—but I do want you to know that when I cast my vote for Bend's mayor, it will be for Sally Russell.

—Joshua Langlais

Lobbyists

Lobbyists for pro-growth forces in Bend have spent over $125,000 to elect two new City Council members to do their bidding at City Hall.

Andrew Davis and Sarah McCormick—who have not previously served this city on any notable level—are recipients of this largesse from the Central Oregon Association of Realtors, the Central Oregon Builders Association, and the Chamber of Commerce PAC.

Davis has received $43,682 from the real estate lobby; McCormick has received $27,182. The builders lobby has given Davis $14,999 and McCormick $15,022. The Chamber PAC has given $15,000 to Davis and $10,000 to McCormick. That's $73,681 for Davis and $52,204 for McCormick. And that is just through October 17.

These are not democratic organizations where members vote on who to endorse. A handful of board members approve these huge campaign contributions.

Davis says he is not beholden to special interests. That's a laugh. Does he really believe that these three special interests have given him over $73,000 out of the goodness of their hearts?

McCormick was the only candidate at the League of Women Voters forum who didn't understand one question and then explained that she was "spaced out." Do you think she'll be "spaced out" when her benefactors instruct her how to vote?

If you want more unaffordable homes and more traffic, vote for Davis and McCormick. If you want the realtors, developers and pro-growth folks at the Chamber of Commerce to run Bend into the ground, vote Davis and McCormick.

If, on the other hand, you want City Councilors who are not bought and paid for by special interests and represent you—the people!—vote for Gena Goodman-Campbell and Barb Campbell. No, they are not related. But they do share common values and a vision that reflects the needs of all of us.

—Michael Funke

Buehler's Flip Flop on Vaccinations

Apparently Dr. Knute Buehler prefers the hypocritical oath to the Hippocratic oath of first do no harm.

When he was a legislator, he supported mandatory preventive vaccinations except in cases where a medical condition contraindicated them.

Now that he is running for governor, he has stated that parents should be able to opt out of having their children vaccinated to prevent serious illnesses.

In so doing, he not only puts those children at risk but also medically fragile individuals in the population.

Rather than do no harm, Buehler's position risks the rise of an epidemic of illnesses that medical science has gone to great lengths to successfully prevent.

Though he claims to disagree with Trump, his obvious rejection of and blatant disregard for scientific facts seems quite similar to those of the so-called president.

One has to ask themselves if Buehler can be this reckless about something he knows will pose a risk to the people, is this a person we want to entrust with the welfare of the state of Oregon.

I think not.

—William Brant

Letter of the Week:

Thanks to all who wrote in this week to share their views on candidates, just ahead of the midterm elections. In the interest of maintaining neutrality in my role as editor, however, I won't be issuing a letter of the week for any of these political letters. Our editorial board endorses candidates; our newsroom does not.

Don't forget to turn in your ballots, no later than 8pm on Tuesday, Nov. 6!

—Nicole Vulcan

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