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Moon Country Snowbusters

Helping maintain trails for more than just snow users

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Matthew Maul and Ryder Fasset taking a break from moving heavy logs out of a trail. - MOON COUNTRY SNOWBUSTERS
  • Moon Country Snowbusters
  • Matthew Maul and Ryder Fasset taking a break from moving heavy logs out of a trail.

Way back in the same year man first walked on the moon, Moon Country formed as a nonprofit to help the Oregon State Snowmobile Association with trail grooming efforts. Over the years since, the clubs have evolved, changed, backstepped and grew, leading to the current Moon Country Snowbusters, formed in October 2017. The name pays homage to the 1969 name, adding Snowbusters to honor both snowmobile clubs that have been in Central Oregon from prior years, according to Kristi DeMoisy, Moon Country Snowbusters' treasurer.

The club maintains trails not just for people who enjoy snowmobiles, but for anyone who enjoys the trails in and around Central Oregon.

"Our club members come form every walk of life, every sport, different ages... you name it," DeMoisy said. "Since the club was formed to groom and maintain trails in Central Oregon for anyone to use, this club benefits anyone that has ever used the trail system for hiking, skiing, biking, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, snow bikes, dirt bikes, quads, UTVs and dog sledding."

DeMoisy said the best way for anyone to help contribute is to become a member of the club—and there is no requirement for a person to own a snowmobile to be a club member.

"The amount of club members is one of the determining factors to how much funding we get from the State of Oregon," DeMoisy said. "The other determining factors are how much we do for our community—we keep track of volunteer hours for trail clearing, volunteering at charities, maintaining shelters, stocking them with wood, plus much more. Our club is making sure that not only are our trails and shelters safe during the winter, but all year around. So we can use help with trail clearing, running the groomers, charity events, donations, man power for cutting wood and stocking shelters, plus much more."

MOON COUNTRY SNOWBUSTERS
  • Moon Country Snowbusters

DeMoisy said this year, Moon Country Snowbusters will start teaching youngsters how to navigate the ins and outs of running a nonprofit, with a youth club made up of kids under the age of 18.

"These kids will get help from the adult club, they will have some funds that we help them get started with but basically will get to choose what they do to help the community," DeMoisy said. "They will design it, and follow through with it. We are going to help get them started by suggesting a few things they can do in November, such as a can drive, donate their time to a shelter or pick up garbage. As far as we know, we are the first club in Oregon to do this and we are excited to see it take off.

"Our goal for Moon Country Snowbusters is to provide the community with a fun place to get involved and earn more members so we can have safe, easy-to-use trails," DeMoisy said. "Our club pays for the trail maps that are at every shelter, at the Forest Service and handed out at local businesses, so people hopefully won't get lost. We want to be involved with the community and be a part of the community's events, plus help educate the community about what a snowmobile club does for motorized and non-motorized sports."

Moon County Snowbusters
mooncountry.us.

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