Recordings you need to hear but may have missed: Otis Redding - The Soul Album | Sound Stories & Interviews | Bend | The Source Weekly - Bend, Oregon

Coverage for Central Oregon, by Central Oregonians.
100% Local. No Paywalls.

Every day, the Source publishes a mix of locally reported stories on our website, keeping you up to date on developments in news, food, music and the arts. We’re committed to covering this city where we live, this city that we love, and we hear regularly from readers who appreciate our ability to put breaking news in context.

The Source has been a free publication for its 22 years. It has been free as a print version and continued that way when we began to publish online, on social media and through our newsletters.

But, as most of our readers know, times are different for local journalism. Tech giants are hoovering up small businesses and small-business advertising—which has been the staple for locally owned media. Without these resources, journalism struggles to bring coverage of community news, arts and entertainment that social media cannot deliver.

Please consider becoming a supporter of locally owned journalism through our Source Insider program. Learn more about our program’s benefits by clicking through today.

Support Us Here

Music » Sound Stories & Interviews

Recordings you need to hear but may have missed: Otis Redding - The Soul Album

by

comment

Otis Redding

The Soul Album

Released 1966

What a feat. In his short 26 years of life, Otis Redding left behind a bunch of studio albums and some of the greatest passion and desperation packed soul recordings. Otis is most known for his pop songs, but The Soul Album offers varying textures and styles that far surpass his other recordings. From horns that pull you in to soulful vocals that demand your attention and compassion, this recording has it all.


No track exudes Otis' powerful delivery better than "Cigarettes and Coffee" (the highlight of this record) where he relates the personal tale of proposing to his love late at night over a quiet and simple hang. By contrast, the upbeat "It's Growing" offers a catchy interpretation of the Smokey Robinson tune.

Other standouts include the rocking "Treat Her Right" (which became the namesake for a Boston blues band in '80s who eventually evolved into '90s rockers Morphine) and "Scratch My Back," which chugs along into genuine blues rhythm.

Hear something real and authentic. Hear something that'll make you both weep and rock - hear The Soul Album by Otis Redding.

About The Author

Add a comment

More by Source Weekly

Latest in Sound Stories & Interviews