Side Notes 12/16-12/23 | Local News | Bend | The Source Weekly - Bend, Oregon

Coverage for Central Oregon, by Central Oregonians.
100% Local. No Paywalls.

The Source Weekly has been here for you, keeping you in the know throughout the coronavirus pandemic.

We’ve delivered important updates and dispatches from a summer of racial unrest.

We’ve interviewed dozens of state and local political candidates to help you make an informed decision during election season.

And we’ve brought you 22 years of important news and feature reporting—along with all the events, happenings, food, drink and outdoors coverage you’ve come to know and love. We’re a newspaper for Central Oregon, by Central Oregonians, and it is and always has been free for readers.

If you’ve appreciated our coverage, we invite you to spread the love and to join our growing membership program. Become a Source Insider today.

Support Us Here

News » Local News

Side Notes 12/16-12/23

by

comment

Another big step was taken toward raising Oregon's minimum wage by the Raise the Wage Coalition last week. The group—which includes an extensive list of human rights, workers' rights, and social justice nonprofits—attained three certified ballot titles from the state's Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum. The ballot initiatives received more than 4,000 signatures, meeting the certification requirement.

Andrea Miller, Executive Director for Causa, says the coalition is still doing research on the initiatives to see which one will move forward. IP 57 would allow local governments to create a minimum wage higher than the state's minimum wage. IP 58 would raise Oregon's minimum wage to $13.50 by 2018, and IP 59 would allow incremental increases in the minimum wage ultimately reaching $13.50 by 2019.

Miller says the coalition's main goal is to engage the Oregon Legislature during the upcoming short session in 2016.

"We believe that it is their responsibility to pass a minimum wage raise," she says. So if the Legislature does pass a bill to raise the minimum wage, a ballot initiative won't be necessary."

The group is advocating for $13.50 because Miller says that's the figure necessary for workers to remain self-sufficient without having to rely on government benefits.

"We've used $13.50 as a gauge so it's not going to cover everything," she says. This amount is what a single mother with one child would need to earn in order to be self-sufficient. Factors like family size and where people live also affect the amount needed to afford the cost of living.

If a bill fails to pass, Miller says the coalition has until July to collect signatures needed for the November ballot.

"Our priority is the Legislature," she says, "but if that doesn't happen, then we'll go to the ballot."

Civic meetings: A regular Bend City Council meeting will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 16 at 7 pm at City Hall, 710 NW Wall St.

About The Author

Add a comment

More by Corinne Boyer