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Music » Sound Stories & Interviews

Thrice as Nice

Folksy trio Red Molly is three solo artists rolled into one first-class band

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With nine solo albums between them—nine rich, rustic and, more importantly, successful solo albums—Laurie MacAllister, Abbie Gardner and Molly Venter already have combined strong individual skills into sentimental harmonies and poetic bluegrass as Red Molly.

The proof that collaboration was a smart move, even with already fruitful careers, will be showcased when the group plays Bend's Tower Theatre on Jan. 11.

The main difference between the classical and country-tinted solo albums that the three have released is that as individuals, the music was velvety soft and pensive. As a band, they harvest roots Americana tempered more for an old-fashioned country fair than a relaxing porch swing.

That is, the music is still delicate, but much less lonely, instead meant to be shared by friends.

In an interview with the Connecticut Post, Red Molly guitarist Venter, who joined the group in 2011, talked about the dynamics resulting from merging the trio's sounds.

"We all have different backgrounds and sides to our artistic impressions," said Venter, the Austin-based brunette and slightly more brooding of the three. "People really respond to all three voices, which become more than the sum of its parts."

Charming songs like "Come On in My Kitchen" and "Does My Ring Burn Your Finger" are anchored by Gardner's dobro and convey a fetching strength that, as good as the three are individually, just wouldn't be possible without tripling their efforts in Red Molly.

In this case, three's company, definitely not a crowd.

Red Molly

7:30 pm.

Saturday, Jan. 11

The Tower Theatre

835 N.W. Wall St.

Tickets $20-$25 at towertheatre.org

About The Author

Ethan Maffey

Both a writer and a fan of vinyl records since age 5, it wasn't until nearly three decades later that Oregon Native Ethan Maffey derived a plan to marry the two passions by writing about music. From blogging on MySpace in 2007 and then Blogspot, to launching his own website, 83Music, and eventually freelancing...

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